24/03/2018 — 23/06/2018

Roy Voss

The Way Things Are

Roy Voss, The Way Things Are. Installation Image at De La Warr Pavilion, 2017.

Photo: Rob Harris

 

Stretching through the Grundy’s two ground-floor gallery spaces, The Way Things Are is a sculpture, precisely and elegantly constructed in poplar wood that approximates to the form of a pier. Inspired by Victorian lithographs, contemporary architects’ drawings and the artist’s own recollections, The Way Things Are extends the artist’s interest in romantic longing; between desire and lived experience, between memory and fact.

Voss finds something simultaneously prosaic and profound about the British seaside pier. If the coastline is a boundary, a marker for the edge of ordinary experience, then the pier forms a space beyond this.

Temporarily taking up the mantle of Blackpool’s fourth pier, The Way Things Are draws our attention to this town’s built heritage and in particular to Blackpool’s three world-renowned piers. Adding extra significance to the presentation of this work in Blackpool this year is the fact that 2018 is the 200th anniversary of the birth of Eugenius Birch, North Pier’s designer.

 

Roy Voss, The Way Things Are 2017 is commissioned by De La Warr Pavilion (Bexhill), Grundy Art Gallery (Blackpool) and Berwick Visual Arts (Berwick).

24/03/2018 — 23/06/2018

Roy Voss

All The World's A Sunny Day

Roy Voss, Over (2017) Framed collage.

Courtesy the artist and Matt's Gallery, London

 

Forming a 360-degree horizon around the walls of the gallery, All the World’s a Sunny Day comprises a series of collages made from found postcards, where a single word has been cut from the back and reinserted into the image on the front. The meanings of these words conflate with the postcard’s image describing something of it and characterising an emotional state.

Posted between the early 1960s and mid-1980s, the mass-produced postcards are now out of date and out of time. Sent both through a sense of duty, but also with love and a need to communicate and share, there is an intimacy in their brief, blue biro messages.

24/03/2018 — 23/06/2018

Neither Land Nor Sea:

Contemporary and Historical representations of

Blackpool’s Piers

H. Burrell Pavilion Fire, North Pier 1921.

Bringing together contemporary and historical representations of Blackpool’s piers, Neither Land nor Sea, documents the enduring appeal of the architecture, atmosphere and activity of these Seaside structures.

Alongside paintings and photographic works from the Grundy’s Collection, a series of images by 19th Century, Blackpool-based photographer, Albert Eden, will also be exhibited. Printed from glass slides; part of Blackpool Council’s Heritage Collections, these images will be shown alongside a selection of work from photographers based in, or with links to Blackpool and the Fylde Coast, for whom Blackpool’s piers are a frequent subject.

Featuring works by; Albert Eden, H. Burrell, Joseph Conrad Morley, Thomas Huson, Simon Roberts, Linzi Cason, Karl Child, Yannick Dixon, Claire Griffiths, Dawn Mander, Jill Reidy, Richard Jon and Kate Yates.

 

 

EVENTS

 

Saturday 14 April, 3pm – 5pm

Neither Land nor Sea, Artists’ Talk

Saturday 9 June, (time tbc)
Blackpool North Pier, Tour and Talk

Saturday 16 June, 3pm – 5pm
The Social History of Blackpool’s Piers, an Illustrated Talk by Tony Sharkey


All events are FREE and will take place at the Grundy apart from the Blackpool North Pier, Tour and Talk. Please contact the Grundy or see our website for further information about any of these events

22/05/2018 — 26/05/2018

fig-futures

Rebecca Birch

Rebecca Birch 'Glass Blowing, Fylde 2017.

Video Still, Photography: Emma Dalesman

 

The last of four fig-futures exhibitions at the Grundy Art Gallery, Rebecca Birch presents The 'Yellowing, part 1', a site-specific installation that invites the viewer to the telling of a story about material, environmental and social surfaces – paper, textile, and rock; Norwegian forest floors, the fields of the Fylde; a kitchen table, a shared song and a knitting circle. The work investigates the politics of the surface: how we order, protect and privilege some surfaces over others, so as to obscure the instability that frequently lies beneath.


For this project, Birch’s own video work is brought into dialogue with a range of natural and archival objects including a selection of original drawings by Patti Mayor from the Grundy’s Collection, and a Harris Tweed sail made specifically for the Rotunda Gallery ceiling. A large table-top conceals the central void between the Grundy’s foyer and first floor gallery. On this table, guided by the audio narration, and supported by the host present in the space, the audience are invited to take part in the unfolding of the installation.

 

'The Yellowing, part 1' illustrates Birch’s on-going practice of gathering histories and narratives in every new location she engages with. For fig-futures the artist has produced a multi-layered, interactive installation that gives a platform, both physically and metaphorically, to a range of voices whose stories cross time and place.

 

fig-futures, supported by Arts Council England, Art Fund and Outset.