14/05/2016 — 13/08/2016

Mark Leckey

This Kolossal Kat, that Massive MOG

Mark Leckey, FEELINTHECAT

Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London

This new exhibition brings together works that involve the artist's long-standing interest in Felix the Cat, the first known broadcast image. Central to the show will be FEELINTHECAT, a major new work commissioned by the Arts Council Collection to mark its 70th anniversary this year.

The exhibition will see a profusion of images of the iconic cartoon cat. In addition to the new commission it will feature a host of works including Inflatable Felix (2013) a giant blow-up version, and earlier works such as Flix (2008), a 16mm film of the cat's tail.

Alongside the main exhibition visitors will also be able to see Leckey’s seminal film Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore (1999), which has been described as ‘perhaps the finest portrayal of British nightlife ever captured’, and here nods to Blackpool’s part in the Northern Soul music scene, which was especially active in North West in the 1960s and 70s.
Mark Leckey (b. Birkenhead, Wirral 1964) has exhibited extensively at numerous venues internationally. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 2008 for his work Industrial Light and Magic.

A further new commission of his work will be shown at the Liverpool Biennial 2016, and he will undertake a major solo exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art MoMA PS1 in New York later in the year.

 

Image: Mark Leckey, Inflatable Felix, 2014, Installation view MADRE, Naples

23/06/2016 — 25/06/2016

Kihlberg & Henry 

This Building, This Breath

Kihlberg & Henry, This Building, This Breath 2015

Courtesy of the artists

This Building, This Breath continues Kihlberg & Henry’s exploration of the disembodied voice in moving image and performance. For this piece, a voiceover is delivered live alongside a 15 minute video, activated whenever somebody enters the room. Here the duo explores cultural understandings of breathing as a device to play with the relationships between language, image, architecture and audience.

In the script, Kihlberg & Henry make use of a varied series of references of breathing, from biological meanings and principles in martial arts and yoga to deviations of the term such as those used in breathing materials and lens breathing. The voiced content coincides with the choreography of projected images as if images were falling from the speakers’ mouth, and retracting with his inhalations, combining eclectic and associative found footage. Adopting mechanisms familiar to the spheres of hypnosis or meditation in the structure and delivery of the script, this Building, This Breath drives towards an abstract proposition that the room itself is breathing.

This Building, This Breath was commissioned by fig-2, supported by the Art Fund, Outset, and Arts Council England.

 

Image Credit: Kihlberg & Henry, This Building, This Breath, 2015

Courtesy of the artists.